Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Donnelley WMA Driving Tour

Donnelley WMA (Wildlife Management Area) consist of 8048 acres in eastern Colleton County near Green Pond, SC. 

The pictures I have posted were taken along the 11 mile driving/cycling tour in Donnelley WMA. 

I cycled the tour and found it to be a great ride.  The roads for the most part are hard packed gravel/dirt roads.  Some of the side roads I took were more grass covered road that were also open to motor vehicles.  The area offers some great wildlife and nature viewing.  Lots of water birds and alligators in the old rice fields and tidal areas.  The area has whitetail deer and feral hogs but with my more or less continued riding on my bicycle I did not see any.







Causeway that was used in separating ricefields from tidal waters.
Yes there is a small alligator on the bank.  The larger one were in hiding.

Causeway that was used in separating ricefields from tidal waters.

Causeway that was used in separating ricefields from tidal waters.


Ricefield Trunk.  The name comes for the original flood controls were actual tree trunks hollowed out and fitted with a plug to control the water flow.

Ricefield Trunk

More of the old ricefield causeway system

More of the old ricefield causeway system


More of the old ricefield causeway system

More of the old ricefield causeway system

More of the old ricefield causeway system


Hardwood stands along the driving tour

Boynton Nature Trailhead.  



More of the old ricefield causeway system


More of the old ricefield causeway system



Thursday, December 20, 2018

Spanish Moss Trail Beaufort SC


Rode Spanish Moss Trail in Beaufort SC the other day 10.3 miles out and back total 20.6 miles. The Spanish Moss Trail (sometimes referred to as the Beaufort Rail Trail or the Magnolia Line Trail) follows the former Port Royal Railroad that was constructed in 1870. The planned 13.6-mile scenic pathway will run through Beaufort County between Port Royal and Yemassee.

I started on the northern most trail head off Clarendon Rd and US-21.  The trail has a concrete surface very well maintained flat smooth and wide with the exception of about a quarter of a mile on the north end that is hard packed gravel.  Lots of views of tidal creeks and marshes with several bridges over the creeks.  It travels through developed area with lots of cross streets.  There are residents and business along the trail but there are also plenty of trees to make the trail feel secluded.  I counted 23 street crossings with 4 of them being major highways with traffic lights to assist with the crossing.  

There are several trail heads and parking along the trail.  Most of the trail would be great for family rides.  The exception in my opinion for the family riding the trail is the major road crossings.  With the aid of Google Maps there is plenty of trail to ride without crossing a major highway.  If you are looking for a trail to put in some miles with a workout this might not be a trail for you but if you are looking for a relaxing ride with some beautiful scenery this is a trail for you.





























Thursday, October 4, 2018

Warm River Rails to Trails Bike Ride


Railroad Right-of-Way Trail
Ashton Idaho



Locals (Ashton Idaho) call it the Warm River Trail due to the fact that it follows the Warm River for the first 7 miles.  In the Ashton the trail head in located in the Warm River Campground located off Scenic Hwy 47 about 10 miles north of Ashton.
The Railroad Right-of-Way Trail winds through the pristine wilderness of Idaho's Targhee National Forest. The sprawling forest is a unit of the even larger Caribou-Targhee National Forest, which borders famous Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks.
Built on a former railroad corridor that once provided tourist access from Idaho Falls, Idaho, to West Yellowstone, Montana, the trail parallels Warm River for a few miles from its south trailhead at Warm Springs Campground. About 3 miles north of the campground, a short tunnel—original to the railroad—leads through a steep piece of terrain. Unfortunately, the tunnel suffered a cave-in in 2008, so access is prohibited. The trail has been rerouted just to the east, providing closer views of the Warm River.
The overall trail length is 34 miles that runs from Ashton to the Montana State line near West Yellowstone Idaho.  The trail surface is gravel/ballast.  Parts of this trail is open to ATV traffic. 
My ride was the first 7 miles starting at the Warm River Campground.  I rode out 7 miles and returned for a total of 14 miles.  I did not encounter any other people on the trial I had it to myself…except the moose and bear I saw along the way. 
Being new to the Gravel Bike Riding and Rails to Trails my description of the trail my not be completely accurate or even a fair description.  That said I will give my best description and condition of the trail….The trail for the most part was pretty well packed gravel/ballast with a few larger rocks thrown in to keep you alert and focused on the trail.  There were a few small pot holes but they were few and far between.  Several area did have some loose gravel that required a little more attention to the path of the bike.  The section of trial I rode was dry and it made an enjoyable ride.  Even if it had been raining and the trail had been wet it would have been no real challenge to ride.  In the 7 miles out I had an elevation gain of just over 600 feet.  The 600 feet in 7 miles was a very gradual incline that was hardly noticed on the incline but made the return to the tail head a pretty much downhill coast very little peddling on the return.
The scenery along the trail in the fall was breath taking.  Riding this trail in early fall was one of the best bike rides I had made.  The leaves were in full color and the weather was near perfect.  The ride along the river was at an elevation above the river to give spectacular views of the river and surrounding landscape.  I stopped often along the ride to take in the views and was fortunate enough to have seen a moose feeding along the bank on the opposite side of the river on the way out.  On the return trip I also spotted a bear on the opposite side of the river in the edge of the woods.  The one question I asked myself was if the bear is on the other side are bears on this side that I did not see…
I pointed out earlier that I have just started with the gravel bike riding switching from the road bike.  I enjoyed my time on the road but it was more about distance and average speed and hill climbing.  With my gravel bike riding I am still focusing on distance and hill climbing with average speed not having the same value for me.  I enjoyed the scenery when riding on the road/paved trails but with the gravel bike I have found that I am riding in areas that have more and different views with plenty of places to stop and enjoy the views.  The next step in my gravel riding is bring along my camera and take some better pictures.  In the past I have only used my cell phone for ride pictures and in the future I plan to take a better camera and get more and better photos of the trails.  
Locals (Ashton Idaho) call it the Warm River Trail due to the fact that it follows the Warm River for the first 7 miles.  In the Ashton the trail head in located in the Warm River Campground located off Scenic Hwy 47 about 10 miles north of Ashton.
The Railroad Right-of-Way Trail winds through the pristine wilderness of Idaho's Targhee National Forest. The sprawling forest is a unit of the even larger Caribou-Targhee National Forest, which borders famous Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks.
Built on a former railroad corridor that once provided tourist access from Idaho Falls, Idaho, to West Yellowstone, Montana, the trail parallels Warm River for a few miles from its south trailhead at Warm Springs Campground. About 3 miles north of the campground, a short tunnel—original to the railroad—leads through a steep piece of terrain. Unfortunately, the tunnel suffered a cave-in in 2008, so access is prohibited. The trail has been rerouted just to the east, providing closer views of the Warm River.
The overall trail length is 34 miles that runs from Ashton to the Montana State line near West Yellowstone Idaho.  The trail surface is gravel/ballast.  Parts of this trail is open to ATV traffic. 
My ride was the first 7 miles starting at the Warm River Campground.  I rode out 7 miles and returned for a total of 14 miles.  I did not encounter any other people on the trial I had it to myself…except the moose and bear I saw along the way. 
Being new to the Gravel Bike Riding and Rails to Trails my description of the trail my not be completely accurate or even a fair description.  That said I will give my best description and condition of the trail….The trail for the most part was pretty well packed gravel/ballast with a few larger rocks thrown in to keep you alert and focused on the trail.  There were a few small pot holes but they were few and far between.  Several area did have some loose gravel that required a little more attention to the path of the bike.  The section of trial I rode was dry and it made an enjoyable ride.  Even if it had been raining and the trail had been wet it would have been no real challenge to ride.  In the 7 miles out I had an elevation gain of just over 600 feet.  The 600 feet in 7 miles was a very gradual incline that was hardly noticed on the incline but made the return to the tail head a pretty much downhill coast very little peddling on the return.
The scenery along the trail in the fall was breath taking.  Riding this trail in early fall was one of the best bike rides I had made.  The leaves were in full color and the weather was near perfect.  The ride along the river was at an elevation above the river to give spectacular views of the river and surrounding landscape.  I stopped often along the ride to take in the views and was fortunate enough to have seen a moose feeding along the bank on the opposite side of the river on the way out.  On the return trip I also spotted a bear on the opposite side of the river in the edge of the woods.  The one question I asked myself was if the bear is on the other side are bears on this side that I did not see…
I pointed out earlier that I have just started with the gravel bike riding switching from the road bike.  I enjoyed my time on the road but it was more about distance and average speed and hill climbing.  With my gravel bike riding I am still focusing on distance and hill climbing with average speed not having the same value for me.  I enjoyed the scenery when riding on the road/paved trails but with the gravel bike I have found that I am riding in areas that have more and different views with plenty of places to stop and enjoy the views.  The next step in my gravel riding is bring along my camera and take some better pictures.  In the past I have only used my cell phone for ride pictures and in the future I plan to take a better camera and get more and better photos of the trails.